Community cemeteries

The cemeteries of the Jewish Religious Community of Warsaw

It is in concert with the Rabbinical Commission for Jewish Cemeteries that the Jewish Community of Warsaw exercises the religious stewardship over the 79 cemeteries located within its administrative boundaries.

Warsaw, Okopowa Street

The cemetery was founded in 1806 and currently encompasses an area of 33.5 ha. Because of the high burial fees charged in that cemetery in the interwar period, it was considered the burial place for wealthy Jews. It is divided into several quarters: the orthodox, the reformed, the children’s, the functionaries’, the military and the ghetto. The Orthodox quarter is further subdivided into the women’s and the men’s sections, plus a special one set aside for the burial of sacred books. What has survived to this day are some 90,000 matzevot and a surrounding brick wall. The cemetery is a listed historic monument deemed one since 2014, pursuant to a decision of the President of the Republic of Poland.

Warszawa, Św. Wincentego Street (the Bródno district)

The cemetery was founded in 1780 by Szmul Jakubowicz Zbytkower, which makes it older than the Okopowa Street Jewish Cemetery. In the interwar period, it was considered the burial ground of Jewish paupers. currently encompasses an area of 13.5 ha. When taking into account the way in which the headstones had been stored, the passage of time and the impact of the soil on the stone, the preserved matzevot can be estimated to number around 10,000. The cemetery is listed as a historic monument. The ongoing renovation and refurbishment works initiated in 2014 will make the cemetery accessible to visitors. Its opening is scheduled for June 2017.

Biała Podlaska, Nowa Street

Established in early 19th century, this cemetery was completely destroyed during the Second World War. The Germans utilised its matzevot in road building and paving. All but three damaged tombstones have thus been lost. At present, the cemetery covers an area of 2.6 ha. A monument commemorating the cemetery and the Biała Podlaska Jews stands on the site. The cemetery is listed as a historic monument. In 1988 it was fenced, but incorrectly. The Jewish Religious Community of Warsaw plans to build a new, properly located surrounding wall.

Góra Kalwaria (Ger), Zakalwaria Street

Established in early 19th century, this burial ground includes the ohel of tzaddik Alter, the Gerer rebbe. During the Second World War, the Germans removed all the matzevot from it and demolished the ohel, and subsequently used the stones as building materials. The cemetery encompasses a fenced site of 1.2 ha and is a listed historic monument.

The Góra Kalwaria Jewish Cemetery may be visited by appointment only.
Please, contact Mateusz Blicharz-Prajs by calling +48 510 233 442.

Karczew, Otwocka Street

Founded in the 19th century, this cemetery is located on a sandy hill. During the Second World War, the Germans shot Jews there and allowed burials of the dead from the local ghetto there. The cemetery tombstones were used as a building material not only in the course the war, but also after it. The cemetery site is fenced, its current area is 1.7 hectares, and the remnant matzevot there number 150.

Lublin, Leszczyńskiego Street (the Wieniawa district)

Established in the 18th century, this cemetery is situated on a high escarpment. It was an active burial ground until the outbreak of the Second World War. In 1940, the Germans destroyed the cemetery completely, using its matzevot as a building material. Partially recovered after the war, those matzevot were transferred to the Walecznych Street New Jewish Cemetery in Lublin. Currently, the cemetery site of 0.7 ha is not fenced. No visible material traces of its presence remain. The only marker of its former existence is a monument that commemorated both the cemetery and the Jews of Lublin and its environs.

Łomazy, Brzeska Street

Established in the 17th century, this cemetery site includes two mass graves dating back to the liquidation of the local ghetto, in which nearly 2,000 Jews are buried. The cemetery has an area of 1.4 ha, is fenced and retains a handful of damaged matzevot. A monument commemorating the victims of the Second World War was erected there in 1988. On the basis of an agreement between the local authorities and the Jewish Community, the town of Łomazy provides the cemetery with necessary maintenance services.

Łuków, Warszawska Street

The cemetery was established in the second half of the 19th century. During the Second World War, the Germans ordered that the dead be buried in a nearby forest while they used the cemetery as the site of summary executions of local Jews. At present, the cemetery plot measure 0.35 ha, the salvaged original matzevot are arranged in the form of a lapidarium. Since 2015, the cemetery has been surrounded by a fence once again.

Mińsk Mazowiecki, Dąbrówki Street

This cemetery, founded in 1870, includes the gravesite of the famous tzaddik Yakov Perlov of Mińsk Mazowiecki (Novominsk). A monument commemorating the victims of the Shoah was erected there in 1967.  The cemetery is a listed historic monument. Its current area is 1 ha, the remnant matzevot there, which number about 500, still stand in their original sections. In 2016, the Jewish Religious Community of Warsaw was able rebuild the cemetery’s fence with the grant assistance of the European Jewish Cemeteries Initiative (ESJF).

Otwock – Anielin, Czerwonej Drogi Street

The cemetery was established in the early part of the 20th century primarily for tubercular patients of a nearby hospital and sanatorium. In the 1970s, a substantial part of the cemetery was destroyed when a high-voltage power line was built across it. Today, about 900 matzevot still stand on this 1.75 ha site. The cemetery is a listed historic monument, but remains unfenced, its boundaries marked by boulders.

Radzyń Podlaski, Lubelska Street

The cemetery was only established in the early 20th century. During the Second World War, the Germans used it for summary executions, and at liquidation of the local ghetto they demolished it completely. The matzevot come to be used as a building material not just during the war, but also in the post-war period. Currently, the cemetery is fenced, occupies an area of 6,600 square metres, and includes only a handful of matzevot.

Siedlce, Szkolna Street

The cemetery was established in 1807 and includes one mass grave of the 1906 pogrom victims and 18 mass graves from the Second World War time. Currently, the cemetery has a fenced area of 3.4 ha, with about 1,000 matzevot there.

Śniadków Górny (Sobienie Jeziory)

Established in 1860, this cemetery was the burial ground for the Jews of Śniadków Górny as well as the patients of the Otwock tuberculosis treatment centre and sanatorium. In the course of the Second World War, the Germans destroyed the cemetery completely. All matzevot were removed from it to be used as paving stones around a nearby rectory, then transformed into the local Gestapo headquarters. In 2009, most of the matzevot were recovered from the rectory area and brought back to the cemetery. At present, it is a 1 ha unfenced site located in a forested area. The cemetery is a listed historic monument.

Węgrów, Joselewicza Street

The cemetery was established in the early 18th century. It served the Jews of Warsaw before the city’s cemetery was built in the Praga district. At present, this area of 0.4 ha is unfenced and carries no visible traces of its cemetery past. Its existence is memorialised by a lapidarium formed out of salvaged matzevot.